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Review: VonShef Masticating Slow Juicer

 

After 6 months of juicing with the VonShef 990W Max. Fruit Juicer, juicer Lee decided to try a different way of juicing and give the VonShef Masticating Slow Juicer a whirl. Read his earlier review here or find out how he got on with his new juicer below.  

Lee Fruit Slow Juicer Review 2

Because I’ve been juicing now for over 6 months, it’s a healthy habit that I’ve really stuck with. I started with the VonShef 990W Power Juicer which has been a great way to get into the world of juicing. However, after doing some research, I found that the because of the nature of power juicing, some nutrients are missed and the juice isn’t fully extracted during the juicing process.  So I decided to upgrade and go for a slow juicer.

The VonShef Masticating Slow Juicer, doesn’t rely on speed like the power juicer to blaze through fruit and vegetables. The slow juicer cold presses, chews and rolls the fruits and vegetable through the machine at a slow and steady pace. This enables the juicer to extract the maximum amount of juice whilst retaining much more of the vitamins and enzymes that can be destroyed in the power juicing process.

The slow juicer took slightly longer to assemble than its power juicing counterpart. The main parts of the slow juicer fit neatly inside each other, to form a solid core for the foodstuffs to travel through. Again, using the instruction manual meant everything fit together neatly and I was up and running in a matter of minutes.

The chute where you insert your fruit and veg is significantly smaller than the power juicer. So there was more preparation to do for each of the ingredients used i.e. to cut them into smaller pieces so they would fit in the chute! I followed the same recipe I originally used with the power juicer:

4 carrots
1 courgette
2 handfuls of spinach
2 handfuls of kale
A few tablespoons of lime juice
A sprinkling of supergreens powder (containing spirulina, alfalfa and wheatgrass)

I could tell a noticeable difference between juicing on the slow juicer vs the power juicer. Firstly, the slow juicer motor is 150W and this means that it’s significantly quieter that the power juicer.

Secondly, the juice that was created was deeper in colour, and the different vegetables’ juice didn’t separate in the glass. With a little research I found out that this separation is directly related to the amount of oxidization that has occurred during the juicing process.

You want the oxidization to be at a minimum because this means that the juice has remained undamaged by the juicing process.  The juice yield of the spinach and kale was also significantly higher and the recipe produced around 300ml of juice, which is approx. 50% more than the power juicer.

For me, there were four clear benefits of using the slow juicer:

  1. It’s much quieter than the power juicers on the market
  2. It’s quick and easy to clean
  3. The slower process yields more juice with more vitamins and enzymes extracted. This means each juice is packed full of more healthy goodness
  4. The higher yield means you’ll actually save money in the long run as you’ll need less fruit and vegetables to get the same amount of juice

Since upgrading to the slow juicer I can see noticeable benefits. I only wish this is something I would have invested in from day one. However, the power juicer was a great stepping stone onto a juicer I feel is more right for me.

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